Search Results

22 results

  1. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 21

    Impact of genotype and management on nicotine concentration in Burley tobacco

    VANN M.C.; MACHACEK J.L.; CHEEK J.A.; SHORT M.M.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Proposed standards from the US-FDA suggest that nicotine should be lowered to non-addictive concentrations in cigarettes (0.3 to 0.5 mg g-1). One such method for lowering nicotine in finished products is to source leaf material with...
  2. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 23

    Effects of genotype and cultural practices on flue-cured tobacco growth, development, and chemistry

    VANN M.C.; CHEEK J.A.; MACHACEK J.L.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    The reintroduction of proposed nicotine standards by the US-FDA warrants further investigations of selected tobacco genotypes and management strategies that may reduce concentrations of the metabolite. To quantify these effects, research was...
  3. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 43

    Cigar wrapper response to nitrogen fertilizer rates in western North Carolina

    SHORT M.M.; VANN M.C.; CHEEK J.A.; MACHACEK J.L.; WHITLEY D.S.
    Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Cigar wrapper tobacco is a new and emerging cash crop in western North Carolina. To develop nitrogen (N) fertilizer recommendations, field trials were initiated in 2020 to quantify the impact of N application rate to cigar wrapper tobacco yield,...
  4. CORESTA Congress, Online, 2020, Agronomy/Phytopathology Groups, AP 14

    A comparison of traditional and alternative fertilizer programs for flue-cured tobacco production

    SHORT M.M.; VANN M.C.; CHEEK J.A.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Previous fertilizer research in flue-cured tobacco has compared a wide range of nutrient programs, ultimately demonstrating the usability and function of numerous sources. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of nitrogen (N)...
  5. CORESTA Congress, Online, 2020, Agronomy/Phytopathology Groups, AP 16

    Nitrogen application programs for fine-textured soils of the North Carolina Piedmont

    VANN M.C.(1); WHITLEY D.S.(1); MASON J.H.(1); HAMBRICK T.(2); STRADER W.(3); DABBS D.C.(4)
    (1) North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Forsyth County Cooperative Extension, Winston-Salem, NC, U.S.A.; (3) Rockingham County Cooperative Extension, Reidsville, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Alamance County Cooperative Extension, Burlington, NC, U.S.A.
    Late-season nitrogen (N) assimilation can greatly impact the yield and quality of flue-cured tobacco, particularly in the fine-textured Piedmont soils of North Carolina. Research was conducted in three environments to evaluate the effects of N...
  6. CORESTA Congress, Online, 2020, Agronomy/Phytopathology Groups, AP 22

    Cigar wrapper tobacco production in western North Carolina

    VANN M.C.; MACHACEK J.L.; CHEEK J.A.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Since 2000, Burley tobacco production has declined by more than 2,000 ha in the Appalachian mountain region of western North Carolina. The loss of Burley tobacco has left a void in the agricultural economy that has not yet been filled by another...
  7. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2019, Victoria Falls, AP 18

    Establishing application protocols for poultry litter and feather meal in organic Burley tobacco production

    SUCHOFF D.H.; VANN M.C.; FISHER L.R.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Information on nutrient management in organic Burley tobacco is limited. Unlike conventional nitrogen (N) sources, which are readily available for plant use upon application, organic N fertilizers require microbial mineralization to become plant...
  8. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2019, Victoria Falls, AP 26

    Cured leaf residues following applications of fluopicolide, indoxacarb, and oxathiapiprolin to flue-cured tobacco

    VANN M.C.; INMAN M.D.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Pesticide residues found on cured tobacco remain a large concern to the allied tobacco industry. To better quantify cured leaf residues, three active ingredients (fluopicolide, indoxacarb, and oxathiapiprolin) were applied to flue-cured tobacco grown...
  9. CORESTA Congress, Kunming, 2018, Agronomy/Phytopathology Groups, AP 16

    Flue-cured tobacco tip leaf yield, quality, value, and color distribution as influenced by cultivar and harvest schedule

    VANN M.C.; FISHER L.R.; INMAN M.D.; WHITLEY D.S.; SEAGROVES R.W.; BARNES K.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Changes in consumer preference and export strategy strongly influence the buying practices of tobacco leaf dealers and cigarette manufacturers. In current times, a dark-colored (orange to red) style of flue-cured tobacco is preferred over a brighter...
  10. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2017, Santa Cruz do Sul, APPOST 06

    Soil applications of maleic hydrazide do not control tobacco axillary bud growth

    VANN M.C.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Increased focus on residues of the plant growth regulator Maleic Hydrazide (MH) have prohibited some U.S. producers from applying the suckercide to control tobacco axillary buds. As such, an alternative to the conventional foliar application of the...