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75 results

  1. TSRC, Tob. Sci. Res. Conf., 2011, 65, abstr. 05

    A cell culture model for chronic exposure to cigarette smoke.

    ARIMILLI S.(1); DAMRATOSKI B.E.(1); PRASAD G.L.(2)
    (1) Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA; (2) R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    A wide range of experimental models, including cell culture systems, have been developed to investigate the cytotoxic and biological effects of cigarette smoke and its constituents, individually and by chemical class. For example, cell culture studies ...
  2. TSRC, Tob. Sci. Res. Conf., 2011, 65, abstr. 07

    Analysis of multiple classes of cigarette smoke constituents by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS).

    HUMSTON-FULMER E.; BINKLEY J.; RILEY M.
    LECO Corporation, Saint Joseph, MI, USA
    The Food and Drug Administration now has the authority to regulate cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, and smokeless tobacco products. Among the areas of regulation is the monitoring of tobacco smoke constituents. It is well known that tobacco smoke is a very ...
  3. TSRC, Tob. Sci. Res. Conf., 2011, 65, abstr. 09

    A fundamental understanding of the filtration of volatile toxicants in cigarette smoke by active carbons.

    BRANTON P.J.(1); MCADAM K.(1); LIU C.(1); DUKE M.G.(1); MOLA M.(1); CURLE M.(1); PROCTOR C.(1); BRADLEY R.(2)
    (1) British American Tobacco, GR&D, Southampton, UK; (2) MatSIRC Ltd., Carbon Technology, Penrith, Cumbria, UK
    The ability of two very different active carbons, a polymer-derived carbon (with ultramicropores and supermicropores and a large volume of 'transport' pores) and a coconut shell-derived carbon (predominantly ultramicroporous), to reduce the ...
  4. TSRC, Tob. Sci. Res. Conf., 2011, 65, abstr. 10

    Reduction of aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide yields in mainstream cigarette smoke using an amine functionalised ion exchange resin.

    BRANTON P.J.; MCADAM K.; LIU C.; DUKE M.G.; WINTER D.; PROCTOR C.
    British American Tobacco, GR&D, Southampton, UK
    Active carbon has been shown to be an effective material for the physical adsorption of many of the smoke volatile species. Volatile species that are less well physically adsorbed include acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide. Alternative ...