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3723 results

  1. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 01

    Flue-cured tobacco response to sub-lethal rates of glufosinate

    VANN M.C.(1); JORDAN D.L.(1); FISHER L.R.(2)
    (1) North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) NC Agriculture Research Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Glufosinate is a broad-spectrum, contact herbicide that is currently applied to genetically engineered row crops that tolerate exposure to the chemical, such as cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), maize (Zea mays), and soybean (Glycine max). Flue-cured...
  2. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 04

    Experiences in evaluation of boron needs in North Carolina flue-cured tobacco production: a summary of plant tissue sufficiency data and impacts on yield and quality

    HARDY D.(1); VANN M.C.(2); JERNIGAN C.(3); McGINNIS M.(1); HICKS K.(1)
    (1) Agronomic Division, North Carolina Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Crop and Soil Science Department, North Carolina State University, NC, U.S.A.; (3) Helena Chemical Co., U.S.A.
    Boron (B), an essential micronutrient for optimum plant growth, is required in trace amounts (<1.1 kg B ha-1) by flue-cured tobacco. In past decades, boron deficiency in North Carolina has not been prevalent. However, recently, its deficiency has...
  3. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 06

    Auxin herbicide exposure: comparisons of 2,4-D and dicamba drift to flue-cured tobacco

    VANN M.C.(1); JORDAN D.L.(1); FISHER L.R.(2)
    (1) North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) NC Agriculture Research Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Auxin herbicide application has increased in North Carolina due to the commercialization of 2,4-D and dicamba tolerant crops. Flue-cured tobacco is extremely sensitive to both herbicides, yet is commonly grown in close proximity to genetically...
  4. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 10

    Genetic analyses of a major partial disease resistance quantitative trait locus (QTL) in tobacco

    SHI Rui(1); JIN Jing(2); SHEW D.(2); LEWIS R.S.(1)
    (1) Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Partial resistance of tobacco to plant pathogens controlled by quantitative trait locus (QTL) is desirable in cultivar development programs because of its increased durability. However, mechanisms underlying this type of resistance are difficult to...
  5. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 17

    Evaluation of novel biological control bacteria for management of angular leaf spot in dark tobacco

    MARTINEZ-OCHOA N.; SHIELDS C.A.; ARAUJO ALVES M.; JOUBERT A.; MILLER R.D.
    University of Kentucky, Department of Plant and Soils, KTRDC, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.
    Angular leaf spot (ALS) caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pst) is the most important foliar disease of dark tobacco in Kentucky. In addition to cultural practices such as crop rotation, sanitation, and removal of debris, the antibiotic...
  6. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 19

    A novel low alkaloid gene

    FISHER A.M.(1); PATRA B.(1); WU X.(2); SINGH S.(1); FISHER C.R.(2); JI H.(1)
    (1) University of Kentucky, Kentucky Tobacco Research & Development Centre, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (2) University of Kentucky, Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, KTRDC, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.
    With possible future regulation of nicotine levels, scientists are searching for ways to lower nicotine in ways acceptable to the tobacco industry. The conventionally bred nic1nic2 low alkaloid (LA) mutants lower nicotine to only about 10 % of...
  7. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 21

    Impact of genotype and management on nicotine concentration in Burley tobacco

    VANN M.C.; MACHACEK J.L.; CHEEK J.A.; SHORT M.M.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    Proposed standards from the US-FDA suggest that nicotine should be lowered to non-addictive concentrations in cigarettes (0.3 to 0.5 mg g-1). One such method for lowering nicotine in finished products is to source leaf material with...
  8. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 22

    The effect of nicotine content on cured leaf quality of Burley

    FISHER C.R.(1); JI H.(2); WU X.(2); FISHER A.M.(2)
    (1) University of Kentucky, Plant & Soil Science Department, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (2) University of Kentucky, Kentucky Tobacco Research & Development Center, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.
    The low alkaloid (LA) varieties generally have smooth, slick darker green leaves that produce an undesirable cured leaf quality. This can be partially explained by the pleiotropic effect of the recessive nicotine alleles also affecting various stress...
  9. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 23

    Effects of genotype and cultural practices on flue-cured tobacco growth, development, and chemistry

    VANN M.C.; CHEEK J.A.; MACHACEK J.L.; WHITLEY D.S.
    North Carolina State University, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
    The reintroduction of proposed nicotine standards by the US-FDA warrants further investigations of selected tobacco genotypes and management strategies that may reduce concentrations of the metabolite. To quantify these effects, research was...
  10. CORESTA Meeting, Agronomy/Phytopathology, 2021, Online, AP 33

    Identification and functional characterization of the pale yellow gene in tobacco

    GRUNDMANN L.(1); PRAMOD S.(2); ADAMS A.(2); FREDERICK J.(2); KAENEL A.(1); NOLL G.(1); XU D.(2); PRUEFER D.(1); LUSSO M.(2)
    (1) Fraunhofer IME, Münster, Germany; (2) Altria Client Services, Richmond, VA, U.S.A.
    The pale yellow (PY) trait in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) was first described in 1969 and was found to be controlled by a single dominant gene. Plants containing a PY gene show accelerated chlorophyll breakdown compared to wild type plants. In...