TSRC, Tob. Sci. Res. Conf., 2017, 71, abstr. 107

A study to examine changes in exposure to cigarette smoke chemicals when a smoker switches to using a tobacco heating product. Part II: study findings

GALE N.(1); ELDRIDGE A.(1); McEWAN M.(1); ERRINGTON G.(1); MURPHY J.(1); PROCTOR C.J.(1); FEARON I.M.(1); McDERMOTT S.(2); GLEW J.(2); HEDGE A.(2)
(1) British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd, Southampton, UK; (2) Covance, Leeds, U.K.

A tobacco heating product (THP), glo™, which heats rather than combusts tobacco and produces significantly reduced machine yields of chemical toxicants compared to combustible cigarettes, was assessed in this study. Biomarker of exposure (BoE) studies are an important tool in determining whether this reduction in toxicant emissions translates to actual reductions in human exposure to cigarette smoke toxicants when smokers switch to using glo™. Data from such studies may potentially be required as part of a regulatory package, particularly as one aspect of a modified-risk assessment of a novel product. This presentation is the second of two and will describe the findings from this study, the design of which was outlined in the first presentation.

180 subjects completed the study. Subjects who switched from smoking to exclusive use of the glo™ device (n=30) for 5 days showed reductions in levels of exhaled carbon monoxide and a range of urinary BoEs, compared to their levels at baseline. In contrast, the continued smoking group (n=30) showed little change in BoE levels throughout the study. We also present data for the continued menthol smoking group (n=30), for subjects switched to the glo™ menthol variant (n=30), and for those subjects who ceased all product use for 5 days (n=30).

Our data show that, when switching from smoking conventional cigarettes to using the glo™ THP, smokers experienced substantial reductions in exposure to smoke toxicants. Longer-term BoE and BoBE studies may demonstrate, respectively, that these reductions continue or are sustained beyond the duration of this study, and whether these reductions in exposure translate to reductions in smoking-related health risks in subjects who switch to using glo™.